Equipoise etymology

The great Buddhist commentator Buddhaghosa traces the Pali word "jhana" (Skt. dhyana) to two verbal forms. One, the etymologically correct derivation, is the verb jhayati, meaning to think or meditate; the other is a more playful derivation, intended to illuminate its function rather than its verbal source, from the verb jhapeti meaning to burn up. He explains: "It burns up opposing states, thus it is jhana" (. i, 116), the purport being that jhana "burns up" or destroys the mental defilements preventing the developing the development of serenity and insight.

The patient should be positioned for comfort, ., in Sims position (lying on the left side with knees and hips comfortably flexed). A chaperone and/or a drape should be provided for patient safety, comfort, and dignity. After an explanation of the procedure to the patient, several mL of surgical lubricant are placed on the examiner's glove, usually on the index finger. The examiner visually inspects the anus and perineum, then places the gloved finger on the anal opening while asking the patient to bear down gently. After the finger enters the anus, it is used to sweep circumferentially around the interior of the distal intestine. It is then directed anteriorly (when examining a male patient) to evaluate the consistency, size, and nodularity of the prostate gland. Samples of stool obtained during the exam may be sent to the lab to test them for the presence of occult blood.

The traditional rule about which preposition to use after compare states that compare should be followed by to when it points out likenesses or similarities between two apparently dissimilar persons or things:   She compared his handwriting to knotted string.   Compare should be followed by with, the rule says, when it points out similarities or differences between two entities of the same general class:   The critic compared the paintings in the exhibit with magazine photographs.   This rule is by no means always observed, however, even in formal speech and writing. The usual practice is to employ to for likenesses between members of different classes:   A language may be compared to a living organism.   But when the comparison is between members of the same category, both to and with are used:   The article compares the Chicago of today with   (or to ) the Chicago of the 1890s. Following the past participle compared, either to or with is used regardless of whether differences or similarities are stressed or whether the things compared belong to the same or different classes:   Compared with (or   to )  the streets of 18th-century London, New York's streets are models of cleanliness and order.  

Equipoise etymology

equipoise etymology

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equipoise etymology

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