Haloperidol mode d'action

Extensively metabolized in the liver and kidneys. It is extensively metabolized by cytochrome P450 isozymes CYP2D6 (major pathway), CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. Approximately 10 to 12 major metabolite have been identified. Hydroxylation at positions 3 and 7 of the phenothiazine nucleus and the N-dimethylaminopropyl side chain undergoes demethylation and is also metabolized to an N-oxide. In urine, 20% of chlopromazine and its metabolites are excreted unconjugated in the urine as unchanged drug, demonomethylchlorpromazine, dedimethylchlorpromazine, their sulfoxide metabolites, and chlorpromazine-N-oxide. The remaining 80% consists of conjugated metabolites, principally O-glucuronides and small amounts of ethereal sulfates of the mono- and dihydroxy-derivatives of chlorpromazine and their sulfoxide metabolites. The major metabolites are the monoglucuronide of N-dedimethylchlorpromazine and 7-hydroxychlorpromazine. Approximately 37% of the administered dose of chlorpromazine is excreted in urine.

LD 50 =350 mg/kg (in mice). Symptoms of overdose include abnormally low blood pressure, confusion, convulsions, dilated pupils and other eye problems, disturbed concentration, drowsiness, hallucinations, impaired heart function, rapid or irregular heartbeat, reduced body temperature, stupor, and unresponsiveness or coma. Side effects include: sedation, hypotension, blurred vision, dry mouth, constipation, urinary retention, postural hypotension, tachycardia, hypertension, ECG changes, heart failure, impaired memory and delirium, and precipitation of hypomanic or manic episodes in bipolar depression. Withdrawal symptoms include gastrointestinal disturbances, anxiety, and insomnia.

Haloperidol mode d'action

haloperidol mode d'action

Media:

haloperidol mode d'actionhaloperidol mode d'actionhaloperidol mode d'actionhaloperidol mode d'actionhaloperidol mode d'action