Male hormone secreted by the testes

Alkaline phosphatase, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and creatinine may vary depending on the patient's current sex hormone configuration. Several factors contribute to these differences, bone mass, muscle mass, number of myocytes, presence or lack of menstruation, and erythropoetic effect of testosterone. Many transgender men do not menstruate, and those with male-range testosterone levels will experience an erythropoetic effect. As such an amenorrheic transgender man taking testosterone, registered as female and with hemoglobin/hematocrit in the range between the male and female lower limits of normal, may be considered to have anemia, even though the lab report may not indicate so. Conversely, the lack of menstruation, and presence of exogenous testosterone make it reasonable to use the male-range upper limit of normal for hemoglobin/hematocrit. Using the male-range upper limit of normal for alkaline phosphatase and creatinine may also be appropriate for transgender men due to increased bone and muscle mass, respectively. In these cases the provider should reference the male normal ranges for their lab.[19]

Each sperm produced by the testes takes about seventy-two days to mature and its maturity is overseen by a complex interaction of hormones. The scrotum has a built-in thermostat that keeps the testes and sperm at the correct temperature. It may be surprising that the testes should lie in such a vulnerable place outside the body, but it is too hot for them inside. Spermatogenesis requires a temperature that is three to five degrees Fahrenheit below body temperature. If it becomes too cool on the outside, the cremaster muscle will contract to bring the testes closer the body for warmth.

In males, LH triggers the production of testosterone by Leydig cells in the testes, which, of course, acts as an endocrine hormone and is essential for the production of sperm. Because it is part of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, its levels are regulated by stimulation and inhibition by GnRH and testosterone (T). Thus, when T levels are low, the hypothalamus is stimulated to increase production of GnRH. This increase in GnRH in turn stimulates LH production. Thus, high LH levels can be an indicator of low T. (Similarly, high FSH levels can also be an indicator of low T.)
 

 

A study by the Women's Health Initiative showed that hormone replacement therapy — both solely estrogen and estrogen-and-progestin — had significant risks. It increased the risk of breast cancer, stroke and blood clots and did not, as predicted, lower the risk of heart disease. Given the danger, hormone replacement therapy should be prescribed on a case-by-case basis. It is currently approved for postmenopausal symptoms, though women who do start hormone replacement therapy are encouraged to try the smallest dose for the shortest amount of time, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Only women with a severe risk of osteoporosis who cannot take non-estrogen therapies should be considered for using hormone replacement therapy preventatively.

Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) - In women FSH is often used as a gauge of ovarian reserve. In general, under 6 is excellent, 6-9 is good, 9-10 fair, 10-13 diminished reserve, 13+ very hard to stimulate. In PCOS testing, the LH:FSH ratio may be used in the diagnosis. The ratio is usually close to 1:1, but if the LH is higher, it is one possible indication of PCOS. Basic hormone testing for males often only includes testosterone and FSH. However, in cases such as Klinefelters Syndrome doctors will usually look at both FSH and LH levels. In males FSH stimulates the Sertoli cells in the testes to produce androgen-binding proteins, testosterone, and a protein called inhibin. Inhibin, in turn, travels in the blood back to the pituitary gland whre it creates a "negative feedback loop" that decreases the output of FSH. Since FSH stimulates testosterone production, and testosterone can be converted to DHT and estradiol, an increase of any or all three can also create a "feedback loop" that decreases FSH secretion.

The second theory is similar and is known as "evolutionary neuroandrogenic (ENA) theory of male aggression". [77] [78] Testosterone and other androgens have evolved to masculinize a brain in order to be competitive even to the point of risking harm to the person and others. By doing so, individuals with masculinized brains as a result of pre-natal and adult life testosterone and androgens enhance their resource acquiring abilities in order to survive, attract and copulate with mates as much as possible. [77] The masculinization of the brain is not just mediated by testosterone levels at the adult stage, but also testosterone exposure in the womb as a fetus. Higher pre-natal testosterone indicated by a low digit ratio as well as adult testosterone levels increased risk of fouls or aggression among male players in a soccer game. [79] Studies have also found higher pre-natal testosterone or lower digit ratio to be correlated with higher aggression in males. [80] [81] [82] [83] [84]

Male hormone secreted by the testes

male hormone secreted by the testes

A study by the Women's Health Initiative showed that hormone replacement therapy — both solely estrogen and estrogen-and-progestin — had significant risks. It increased the risk of breast cancer, stroke and blood clots and did not, as predicted, lower the risk of heart disease. Given the danger, hormone replacement therapy should be prescribed on a case-by-case basis. It is currently approved for postmenopausal symptoms, though women who do start hormone replacement therapy are encouraged to try the smallest dose for the shortest amount of time, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Only women with a severe risk of osteoporosis who cannot take non-estrogen therapies should be considered for using hormone replacement therapy preventatively.

Media:

male hormone secreted by the testesmale hormone secreted by the testesmale hormone secreted by the testesmale hormone secreted by the testesmale hormone secreted by the testes

http://buy-steroids.org