Some surprising facts

  “A red ‘pudong’ was called ‘magalong’, and was the insignia of braves who had killed an enemy. The most prestigious kind of ‘pudong,’ limited to the most valiant, was, like their G-strings, made of ‘pinayusan,’ a gauze-thin abaca of fibers selected for their whiteness, tie-dyed a deep scarlet in patterns as fine as embroidery, and burnished to a silky sheen. Such pudong were lengthened with each additional feat of valor: real heroes therefore let one end hang loose with affected carelessness.” 

Running burns lots of calories
The old saw that running torches about 100 calories per mile is a good benchmark, but calorie burn really depends on weight, and your pace and fitness level also come into play. A good formula is to multiply your weight in pounds by , then multiply by the number of miles. The number you get is the amount of calories you burned over and above the basal metabolic rate (calories you burn just sitting around). If a 150-pound woman runs 6 miles, she'll burn about 567 calories. But as you get fitter, running the same number of miles won't burn as many calories . Then it's time to go faster—or longer.

When champagne was first being developed it was nicknamed le vin du diable , or "the devil's wine" because of exploding bottles and flying corks. This is because, with champagne, fermentation continues after it is bottled. Champagne corks have been proven to shoot off at speeds of 45 miles per hour (and faster). That's 66 feet per second! It's easily enough to shoot your eye out. Always make sure the bottle is pointed in a safe direction when you pop it open. Grip it tight, and use a cloth to keep your hand or the cork from slipping. I have witnessed a flying cork break a four-inch chunk of molding off of a wooden door trim. It was a scary party.

Throughout this century, improvements in nutrition and health have led to increases in the growth rate and the ultimate height and weight of American children. Poor children have clearly benefited from this trend. Today, poor boys at ages 18 and 19 are actually taller and heavier than boys of similar age in the general . population in the late 1950s. They are one inch taller and some 10 pounds heavier than GIs of similar age during World War II and nearly two inches taller and 20 pounds heavier than American doughboys back in World War I. [15]

I wonder whether you have been in other European countries. Many, if not most of the fun facts are European, not exclusively Swiss. Nowadays, with not much money passing the counter at the bank, the counters are open again and only the cashier is still in a bullet proof glass box. We have coin-operated trolleys in Europe since more than 30 years, introduced by the biggest trolley manufacturer in France. At traffic lights one has to wait for green light before turning right. All traffic going straight, including pedestrians, must be given way by turning traffic. That’s all European, not Swiss.

Some surprising facts

some surprising facts

Throughout this century, improvements in nutrition and health have led to increases in the growth rate and the ultimate height and weight of American children. Poor children have clearly benefited from this trend. Today, poor boys at ages 18 and 19 are actually taller and heavier than boys of similar age in the general . population in the late 1950s. They are one inch taller and some 10 pounds heavier than GIs of similar age during World War II and nearly two inches taller and 20 pounds heavier than American doughboys back in World War I. [15]

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